About Mission

The Technion Autonomous Systems Program is a multi-departmental and multidisciplinary unit, the first of its kind in universities in Israel. Autonomous systems represent the next great step forward in the fusion of machines with sensors, computers, and communication capabilities. The objective is to develop intelligent systems that can interact dynamically with the complexities of the real world. Developments in artificial intelligence, machine learning, sensor technology, robotics among others, are the components of development and practical application of autonomous systems.

Overview

Autonomous systems represent the next phase in the fusion of machines with sensors, computers, and communication capabilities. The objective is to develop intelligent systems that can interact in real time with the complexities of the real world. These systems can make their own decisions independently about how to act, even in groups. This is important, and even essential especially in unplanned, rapidly changing, or unexpected conditions.

Autonomous systems include performance-enhanced unmanned or optionally piloted aerial vehicles (including drones) , autonomous cars & trucks, unmanned vehicles for under-water, land-based, underground  and space exploration. Typical applications include environmental disaster cleanup operations; rescue operations; detection, identification, and neutralization of chemical or biological hazards and explosives; transportation and traffic control systems; communication networks and  the Internet of Things (IoT). These and  a wealth of other implementations will drive progress in all sectors of life, including defense,  industry,  transportation, the home and social environments. Through TASP, the Technion does cutting edge research in all of these areas.

To focus the leading autonomous systems research that is already being successfully pursued on campus, the Technion, as Israel’s premier engineering school, established the Technion Autonomous Systems Program (TASP) in 2007 in a visionary move. It now is the scientific second home for over 15% of Technion faculty members, from nine different departments.

Membership of TASP is comprised of  researchers from the following faculties: Aerospace Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Industrial Engineering & Management, Biomedical Engineering, Medicine and Education in Science and Technology. Research activities take place in established laboratories.

This program provides a venue for interdisciplinary, application-oriented research and development of complete autonomous systems, including hardware, software, operation principles, manufacturing maintenance and ethical considerations.

TASP Divisions

The concept driving the Technion Autonomous Systems Program is to develop a research matrix with multidisciplinary teams that will define and develop principles and applications enabling autonomous solutions in various areas of human endeavor. The advantage of the Program framework is that individual scientists from the different disciplines will be able to participate in several teams, interacting with others in joint work, group meetings, and seminars, thus gaining effectiveness from a fully multidisciplinary endeavor.

The first three major Divisions are the following:

  • Unmanned Aerial & Space Systems Division
  • Unmanned Ground Systems Division
  • Unmanned Marine Systems Division